April 18, 2015

Trailer Trash – Star Wars VII + Batman V Superman: Dawn of Justice

Filed under: Trailer Trash! — Rodney Twelftree @ 9:28 am

Trailer-Trash-Star-Wars-+-Superman-Batman

What a week! First, our latest look at the upcoming Star Wars film arrived, courtesy of a massive franchise convention, and the expected hooplah that entailed. To say the last 48 hours has been massive is…. well, a massive understatement.

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April 17, 2015

Movie Review – Exodus: Gods & Kings

Filed under: Movie Review — Rodney Twelftree @ 12:01 am

Exodus-Gods-And-Kings-Review-Logo

- Summary -

Director : Ridley Scott
Year Of Release :  2014
Principal Cast :  Christian Bale, Joel Edgerton, John Turturro, Aaron Paul, Ben Mendelsohn, Ben Kingsley, Sigourney Weaver, Maria Valverde, Indira Varma, Hiam Abbass, Kevork Malikyan, Anton Alexander.
Approx Running Time :   150 Minutes
Synopsis:   The Biblical tale of Moses leading the Hebrews out of slavery in Egypt, across the Red Sea and to freedom.
What we think : Although it seems to abscond with avoiding a lot of the faith-centered teachings of Moses’ exodus story, Gods & Kings certainly makes up for it in ambition. Sadly, at the end of the day, ambition doesn’t amount to much if the central thrust of the movie lacks impact. Hard as it might seem to believe, but master storyteller Ridley Scott gives us a rambling, uneven, often lethargic voyage into 2014’s second biblical outing, a visually stunning yet narratively inert take on the famous story.

At the end of the day, can’t we all just get along?

Biblical epics seemed to be the order of the day in 2014 – the stories of both the Exodus, and Noah’s Ark, were given blockbuster status by two renowned directors. Noah, helmed by Darren Aaronofsky, was met with mumbled indifference and wholesale avoidance in some parts. Exodus, assuming its rather portentous subtitle Gods & Kings, is the attempt by master visualist Ridley Scott, whose allure has waned in the last several years (*cough*Prometheus*cough*), to bring the story of Moses leading the slaves out of Egypt to life; it’s been done before, notably with Charlton Heston’s The Ten Commandments, as well as a Dreamworks animated film, The Prince Of Egypt, enshrining the famous Biblical story for all generations. So what makes this version of the Exodus story different? Or better? Or worse?

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April 16, 2015

Is Over-Promotion Killing Movies?

Filed under: Film - General,Opinion — Rodney Twelftree @ 3:52 pm

Film-Over-Promotion

Today, Zack Snyder, the director of the upcoming Batman vs Superman: The Dawn Of Justice film, released a 20 second teaser for the upcoming IMAX teaser trailer for the film on Monday 20th.

Are you kidding me? Another teaser clip to promote a teaser trailer? Age Of Ultron’s marketing campaign has also been in overdrive the last week or so, in the lead-up to the release in most markets next week of what is expected will be the year’s most successful movie. Footage from the film is released almost daily, it seems, with the studio (Marvel) trying to maximize anticipation and gather in probable record-breaking opening-weekend grosses across the globe (save America, which has to wait an extra week, suckers!), prompting many fans to complain that by the time Age Of Ultron actually arrives in cinemas, there’ll be more footage already seen than not!

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April 15, 2015

Sucker Punch – How Daredevil Became The Best Marvel Project Yet

Filed under: Opinion — Rodney Twelftree @ 3:58 pm

Sucker-punch-Daredevil-Review-Logo

When the dust settles, there’s little doubt the box-office champ of 2015 will be Marvel’s Avengers: Age of Ultron, a guaranteed blockbuster smash that pits the worlds greatest heroes together against a formidable adversary. In line with Marvel’s cinematic universe, the company’s television tentacles keep coming out and snatching surprise from me, something I wasn’t prepared for when I gave up on Agents Of SHIELD at about episode four. I still haven’t gone back to it, even though I’m told “it’s improved”. Agent Carter, on the other hand, I adored.

2015 also saw the 13-episode series Daredevil, financed by Marvel and online film and television distributor Netflix, released to the public en masse – similarly to House Of Cards, the binge-watch crowd lapped up Daredevil’s assault on bandwidth during mid April, and the results have been nothing short of spectacular.

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Movie Review – Pyramid, The

Filed under: Movie Review — Rodney Twelftree @ 12:01 am

The-Pyramid-Review-Logo

- Summary -

Director :  Gregory Levasseur
Year Of Release :  2014
Principal Cast :  Ashley Hinshaw, Denis O’Hare, James Buckley, Daniel Amerman, Amir K, Joseph Beddelem.
Approx Running Time :   89 Minutes
Synopsis: A group of archaeologists and documentary film-makers become trapped inside a giant buried pyramid in Egypt. And they’re not alone.
What we think :  Oh woe is us. A found footage film, set beneath the surface of the Earth, dealing with ancient Egyptian tombs. The premise (like most found footage films) is quite enthralling, but equally similar to most other films of the genre, the end result of shaky-cam darkness and random screaming, sound-cutouts and digital white-noise is once again deafening on a creative level. The Pyramid would have made a really decent traditional narrative film, but as a found footage entry, relies too heavily on genre tropes to generate much beyond D-level interest.

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The tag-line sounds like a porno I watched once.

Truth be told, I only watched this film because the poster looked so cool. Okay, here’s how stupid this film is: at one point, after a bunch of random characters have been running around an ancient underground pyramid being chased by some weird thing nobody can see, one of the women asks the main dude “are you sure this is the way”, like he’d know. Really? Are you sure this is the way? Is that what passes for plot development or something? The Pyramid is a film gorging on adequacy. Filmed predominantly “found footage” style, although sporting an occasional “traditional” camera shot here and there, The Pyramid has at least an interesting, if somewhat uncreative, plot device working in its favor. Mixing a bit of Aliens, a little bit of The Descent, and a whole lot of Stargate’s dusty, mummified creepiness (ha!), The Pyramid isn’t nearly as bad as the consensus ratings would have you believe, but it’s not far from the bottom of the barrel.

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April 13, 2015

Movie Review – Night At The Museum: Secret Of The Tomb

Filed under: Movie Review — Rodney Twelftree @ 12:01 am

Night-At-The-Museum-3-Review-Logo

- Summary -

Director :  Shawn Levy
Year Of Release :   2014
Principal Cast :  Ben Stiller, Robin Williams, Owen Wilson, Steve Coogan, Ricky Gervais, Rebel Wilson, Skyler Gisondo, Dan Stevens, Rami Malek, Patrick Gallagher, Mizuo Peck, Ben Kingsley, Dick van Dyke, Mickey Rooney, Bill Cobbs, Anjali Jay, Voice of Brad Garrett + Regina Taufen.
Approx Running Time :   98 Minutes
Synopsis:   Larry the Nighwatchman must travel to England to discover why the Tablet of Ahkmenra is losing its powers. Along the way, he meets fabled Knight, Sir Lancelot, as well as an ancient Egyptian Pharaoh.
What we think :  Limping to the finish line often brings an audience to its feet. We root for the underdog, no matter how they struggle. Watching Secret of The Tomb limp towards the closing stretch is a futile exercise in mediocrity. Bereft of genuine charm, and suffering a distinct sense of the verve encapsulated in its vivacious second entry, this third, bungled museum-hunt will have you checking your watch rather than the screen.

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It’s fair to say the Night At The Museum movies were never meant to be high art – hell, they star Ben Stiller, who remains one of the most overrated “comedic” stars in Hollywood, so you could be forgiven for thinking them something of an ego piece – and as an example of audiences tapping into their light, breezy high-concept mantra of fun-n-adventure, they’re relatively cheery entries into the hijinks genre. Secret Of the Tomb, the third and final entry into the franchise, sees the entire original cast return (including Dick van Dyke, the late Mickey Rooney, and Bill Cobb, who played the first films’ villains) and the introduction of some new – and painfully inane – characters. Again, considering this film isn’t meant to be focused on winning an Oscar, you give a little slack for things such as character development or backstory (the film assumes you’ve seen the first two films, duh), and in saying that this movie has plenty working in its favor. Yet, hints of bitterness and a decided lack of zesty humor (most of which comes from Stiller, weirdly) skewer the grandiose conclusion to this nighttime lark in the halls of the worlds great museums, a franchise I’ve no doubt has benefited students and learning institutions across the globe.

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April 10, 2015

Vale – Richard Dysart

Filed under: Obituary — Rodney Twelftree @ 10:21 am
Richard Dysart - 1929-2015

Richard Dysart – 1929-2015

American film and television actor Richard Dysart has passed away.

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Movie Review – Woman In Black, The: Angel Of Death

Filed under: Movie Review — Rodney Twelftree @ 12:01 am

The-Woman-In-Black-Angel-of-Death-Review-Logo

- Summary -

Director :  Tom Harper
Year Of Release :  2014
Principal Cast :  Phoebe Fox, Jeremy Irvine, Helen McCrory, Adrian Rawlins, Leanne Best, Ned Dennehy.
Approx Running Time :   98 Minutes
Synopsis: Seized by the government and converted into a military mental hospital during World War II, the sudden arrival of affected children to Eel Marsh House has awoken its darkest inhabitant. Eve, a beautiful young nurse, is sent to the house to care for the children, but soon realizes she must save them from more than their own demons. Despite Eve’s efforts to stop her, one by one they fall victim to the Woman in Black.
What we think :  Leisurely paced sequel is nowhere near as skin-crawling as its predecessor; the cast are game for it, and Tom Harper has a keen eye for period detail, but as a scare-fest, Angel of Death leaves most of its good stuff until the end, and then it’s too late. If you enjoyed the first you might enjoy this, but remember to keep your expectations low.

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The surprise success of 2012’s The Woman in Black, a feature starring Harry Potter alum Daniel Radcliffe, was always going to ensure a sequel. Angel Of Death, the nomenclature subtitle of said sequel, lacks Radcliffe’s presence, and to a large degree removes a lot about what made the first film really rather effective, but as a work of scare-fiction, it does some nice work with limited material. Others may find Angel Of Death a drudge and a chore to watch – it’s a plodding opening half that removes a lot of creepy atmosphere the film’s final third ramps up – but on the whole, for a small-budget chiller, it’s satisfactory.

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April 9, 2015

Vale – Geoffrey Lewis

Filed under: Obituary — Rodney Twelftree @ 11:53 am
Geoffrey Lewis - 1935-2015

Geoffrey Lewis – 1935-2015

American character actor Geoffrey Lewis, who appeared alongside Clint Eastwood in a number of films, has passed away.

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The Ferncast – Episode 3: American Sniper + iiNet vs Dallas Buyers Club clarification

Filed under: Ferncast — Rodney Twelftree @ 12:01 am

Ferncast-2015-Episode-3

Welcome to our third Ferncast! Today we’re talking about American Sniper, a film we’ve reviewed here at Fernby Films but felt it pertinent to discuss as part of its Oscar nomination and subsequent campaign. In a small “stop the presses” moment, we also discuss our stance on the recent case between the producers of Dallas Buyers Club (Voltage Pictures) and iiNet, one of Australia’s large ISP’s, who have recently had a court case to determine if Voltage can be given the names and addresses of people it suspects of illegally pirating their movie. You can find our original article about that here, but we felt it prudent to clarify some of our statements in that article.

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April 8, 2015

Vale – Tom Towles

Filed under: Obituary — Rodney Twelftree @ 2:56 pm
Tom Towles - 1950-2015

Tom Towles – 1950-2015

American actor Tom Towles, who is most famous for his performance in Henry: Portrait of A Serial Killer, has passed away.

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Movie Review – Hunger Games, The: Mockingjay Part 1

Filed under: Movie Review,The Hunger Games Franchise — Rodney Twelftree @ 12:01 am

Hunger-Games-Mockingjay-Part-1-Review-logo

- Summary -

Director : Francis Lawrence
Year Of Release :  2014
Principal Cast :  Jennifer Lawrence, Josh Hutcherson, Liam Hemsworth, Woody Harrelson, Elizabeth Banks, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Julianne Moore, Donald Sutherland, Natalie Dormer, Sam Claflin, Jena Malone, Stanley Tucci, Willow Shields, Edgar Wright, Paula Malcomson, Robert Knepper.
Approx Running Time :  118 Minutes
Synopsis: Katniss Everdeen joins the ranks of a rebel force to thwart the dictatorial rule of President Snow in the Capitol.
What we think :  Part 1 of a one-two punch to audience empathy with this franchise – a lifeless, inert example of splitting a single book into a two-film effort that thins out the material and leaves narrative energy aside in favor of stretching extraneous characters across the running time. If you don’t mind watching chess played by others, Mockingjay Part 1 will probably excite, but for everyone else, this is a melancholy bore.

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Mockingjay, the third novel in Suzanne Collins’ successful trilogy about a dystopian world in which teenagers battle for the sport of a narcissistic upper class, comes to us as a film – or rather, films – in a manner that once more engenders the discussion, and validity, of splitting a single novel into multiple parts. They did it with Twilight. They did it with Harry Potter. And now, another two-part conclusion to a story that probably warrants only one; at least, that’s my view, because I have yet to truly embrace or enjoy a single one of these Hunger Games films. With one hand clutching her Oscar, and the other speed-dialling lawyers in the wake of The Fappening, Jennifer Lawrence’s final contractual obligation to this franchise is nearly up, but in order to get to the meaty (we hope) Part 2 of this cash-grab, we need to wade deep into the muck of Part 1. So deep breath, folks, as we take apart Mockingjay – Part 1, the nearly-almost-kinda final episode in this big-budget turkey known as The Hunger Games franchise.

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Who’s The Face Of Superhero Cinema?

Filed under: Film - General,Opinion — Rodney Twelftree @ 12:01 am

RDJ_1

Superheroes have taken over Hollywood in the past 15 years, and the effects on the industry are staggering. It almost seems harder to think of an A-list star who hasn’t attempted a role in a superhero film than to list the ones who have.

Marvel and DC both have their cinematic empires; characters like the Hulk and Spider-Man have already been established and rebooted in the space of a decade; heroes are popping up on TV shoes and in Netflix series; and a recent article in The Verge even went so far as to say the Fast & Furious series has become its own brand of superhero saga, suggesting that the lines between ordinary action and comic heroism are blurring.

But with all that said, who are the characters that have stood out the most? Much as John Wayne owns the old western genre, or Sean Connery is still many people’s pick as the best James Bond, the sub-genre of superhero action will probably wind up with a single lasting face who defines the era in film. And with Avengers: Age Of Ultron about to be released as the biggest superhero project to date, now seems as good a time as ever to sift through the heroes and pick the most iconic one of the bunch.

Here are our picks.

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April 7, 2015

We will not support Voltage Pictures, and here’s why.

Filed under: Film - General,From the Editor,Opinion,Website Update — Rodney Twelftree @ 11:10 pm

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Ever seen The Hurt Locker? Maybe you dipped into Don Jon, that hilarious Joseph Gordon-Levitt flick from 2013? Perhaps you’re anticipating the release of Adam Sandler’s The Cobbler? Or, did you suck up and witness the brain-flap of The Dallas Buyers Club?

If you did, you should know that all those films (plus a bunch of others nobody here at Fernby Films gives a shit about) were produced by a company known as Voltage Pictures. They’re an American movie studio currently doing the rounds of planet Earth trying to prosecute people it sees as having pirated (or stolen, or pinched) their films via online distribution methods – torrenting.

This article isn’t about pirating, inasmuch as it’s about Voltage’s blanket, carte-blanche idea running alongside the notion of “speculative invoice”, ie the sending of a letter designed to terrify the mom-and-dad families, and technologically innocent parties who may have even unwittingly allowed film piracy on their home internet network with monumental financial losses through protracted and expensive court battles.

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April 6, 2015

Movie Review – Dumb And Dumber To

Filed under: Movie Review — Rodney Twelftree @ 12:01 am

Dumb-And-Dumber-To-Review-Logo

- Summary -

Director :   Bobby Farrelly + Peter Farrelly
Year Of Release :  2014
Principal Cast :  Jim Carrey, Jeff Daniels, Laurie Holden, Kathleen Turner, Steve Tom, Rachel Melvin, Robb Riggle, Paul Blackthorne, Brady Bluhm, Dalton Gray.
Approx Running Time :  110 Minutes
Synopsis:  Lloyd and Harry embark on a road trip to locate Harry’s adopted daughter, in order to obtain a new kidney from her.
What we think : Look, I love Jim Carrey, and probably always will. It’s a shame he’s sullied himself with this rubbish, a blatant cash-in on one of his earlier films that, frankly, didn’t need to be made. Uneven, wildly unfunny in most parts, and filled with the same kind of juvenile humor that made the first film work (but, for whatever reason, doesn’t here!), this mild, inadequate sequel will make you wish for the days of Liar Liar and Ace Ventura.

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Ahh, reminiscence. If only things from our youth were still just as good now. Dumb and Dumber To, the long-awaited Jim Carrey/Jeff Daniels sequel to Dumb And Dumber, is based almost entirely on how funny you remember the original, only without the charm, the casual 90’s idiocy and the laugh-out-loud antics of a pre-“I’m a serious actor” Jim Carrey. Dumber To, a sequel lacking grammatical accuracy as well as any semblance of humor other than toilet gags and the aged Carrey trying to recapture his youth, I found this effort a tiresome, beleaguered, strained film hoping to boost more than one flagging career.

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April 3, 2015

Movie Review – Pirates Of The Caribbean: At World’s End

Filed under: Movie Review,Pirates Of The Caribbean — Rodney Twelftree @ 12:01 am

Pirates-Of-The-Caribbean-At-Worlds-End-Review-Logo

- Summary -

Director :  Gore Verbinski
Year Of Release :  2007
Principal Cast :  Johnny Depp, Orlando Bloom, Geoffrey Rush, Keira Knightley, Bill Nighy, Stellan Skarsgaard, Chow Yun-Fat, Tom Hollander, Jack Davenport, Kevin McNally, Naomie Harris, Jonathan Pryce, Keith Richards, Lee Arenberg, Mackenzie Crook, Greg Ellis.
Approx Running Time :  168 Minutes
Synopsis:  With the East India Trading company hunting them down, all the Pirate Lords gather at Shipwreck Cove to deliberate – fight, or flee?
What we think :  Convoluted mess of a film has some minor chuckles, a swag of gargantuan effects and a limitless desire to please, but can’t muster much more than a headache. Depp’s Captain Jack is marginalized in favor of even third-rung characters, and a dull-as-dishwater romantic lapse by Orlando Bloom and Keira Knightley’s characters cause At World’s End to flounder badly in its latter stages. An overblown, overeager waste of everyone’s time.

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I’m only surprised nobody thought to throw in the kitchen sink. I mean, this film has it all. And that’s not good.

Sequels to cinematic successes are fraught with danger. Most of the time, audiences simply want to see the same characters again, doing similar things, and (mostly) using a similar template to the original film. Filming two sequels at the same time, in the hope they’ll both be a success, is an even more perilous scenario – if the first sequel bombs, you still have to release the second one, hoping to recoup your money. For the first and second Pirates Of The Caribbean sequels, Dead Man’s Chest and At World’s End, you’d hardly describe them as “bombs” in the true sense of the word; At World’s End, then the most expensive movie ever made at around $300m, made a staggering $960m at the box office, but as we all know, box office success doesn’t always make it a good film. Michael Bay will attest to that. With the first Pirates movie being both a box-office and a critical success (a rare double feat in blockbuster entertainment), and Dead Man’s Chest meeting with decidedly mixed reviews, At World’s End had to recapture the spirit of the original movie, and conclude the adventures of an apparently deceased Jack Sparrow (who dove into the maw of the Kraken at the end of the previous film) and a recently revived Barbossa (who was killed off at the end of Curse Of The Black Pearl, and who makes his triumphant return in a shattering cliffhanger in Dead Man’s Chest). Does At World’s End meet the expectations of Pirates fans the world over, or is the film a middling mess of high-seas hijinks that makes little sense whatsoever?

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April 2, 2015

Movie Review – Pirates Of The Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest

Filed under: Movie Review,Pirates Of The Caribbean — Rodney Twelftree @ 12:01 am

Pirates-Of-The-Caribbean-Dead-Mans-Chest-Review-Logo

- Summary -

Director :  Gore Verbinski
Year Of Release :
Principal Cast :  Johnny Depp, Orlando Bloom, Keira Knightley, Bill Nighy, Stellan Skarsgard, Tom Hollander, Kevin NcNally, Jack Davenport, Jonathan Pryce, Lee Arenberg, Mackenzie Crook, Naomie Harris, David Baille, Martin Klebba, David Schofield, Geoffrey Rush.
Approx Running Time :  145 Minutes
Synopsis:   Jack Sparrow races to recover the heart of Davy Jones to avoid enslaving his soul to Jones’ service, as other friends and foes seek the heart for their own agenda as well.
What we think :  There’s almost too much story here, too many characters trying to do too much, and the film’s bloated mid-section almost brings things undone. In spite of this, however, I still find this one the most enjoyable of the Pirates sequels. While not a patch on the original, Dead Man’s Chest is filled with stunning production design and some nice comedic moments intertwined with the drama.

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Down to Davey Jones’ locker….

I guess it was inevitable. After the massive success of the first Pirates Of The Caribbean movie, The Curse Of the Black Pearl, it would follow that Disney would seek to further option their franchise potential with a sequel – hell, not one, but two, filmed back-to-back (after all, it worked for Lord of The Rings, right?) and released a year apart. Almost the entire original cast reprise their roles, with a few new additions to the mix; namely, Bill Nighy as the dweller of the depths, Davy Jones, and Tom Hollander as a dastardly East India Trading Company lackey who seeks a fabled treasure all to himself. The folly of mounting a 2-film production in such a way meant that if the first sequel bombed (unlikely, but possible, said the Wachowski Brothers…ahem) then the second sequel (in this case, At World’s End) might be a disaster from which resurrection would be impossible. Now, I get the general distaste for Dead Man’s Chest; it’s a bloated, messy, poorly structured venture into the same twisting narrative that made Black Pearl so charming, and if you’ve not seen the original film then this one will make no sense whatsoever. But I still enjoy it.

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April 1, 2015

Movie Review – Pirates Of The Caribbean: The Curse Of The Black Pearl

Filed under: Movie Review,Pirates Of The Caribbean — Rodney Twelftree @ 12:01 am

Pirates-Of-The-Caribbean-Curse-Of-The-Black-Pearl-Review-Logo

- Summary -

Director :  Gore Verbinski
Year Of Release :  2003
Principal Cast :  Johnny Depp, Orlando Bloom, Keira Knightley, Geoffrey Rush, Jack Davenport, Jonathan Pryce, Kevin McNally, Zoe Saldana, Lee Arenberg, Mackenzie Crook, Daniem O’Hare, David Baille, Giles New, Angus Barnett.
Approx Running Time :  142 Minutes
Synopsis:  Blacksmith Will Turner teams up with eccentric pirate “Captain” Jack Sparrow to save his love, the governor’s daughter, from Jack’s former pirate allies, who are now undead.
What we think :   Effortlessly engaging, the first in what would become a multi-film franchise remains the most complete, self-contained and enjoyable of all these “romps”. Led by Johnny Depp’s charismatic Jack Sparrow, and Geoffrey Rush’s Captain Barbossa, Curse Of the Black Pearl is high Hollywood hokum that looks, sounds, and is just as enjoyable now as it was back in 2003. So take a moment to revisit a time before Depp became a parody of himself, and before this series nosedived into the tidal pools of iniquity. It’s a blast.

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Drink up me hearties, yo ho!

If you’d told me back in 2002 that a film based on a ride at one of the worlds most successful amusement theme parks would become a (to-date) four film franchise grossing billions of dollars and turning Johnny Depp into one of the most recognizable mainstream actors on the planet, I’d have laughed right in your face. Today, the ever present Depp remains on the Hollywood A-list, largely through his associations with kooky, weird characters (Willy Wonka, The Big Bad Wolf, The Mad Hatter, Tonto, among others) in big budget blockbusters. Although the lure of his name is tarnished somewhat nowadays, back in 2003 he was still a major draw, and headlining a film like The Curse Of The Black Pearl, a swashbuckling adventure film based on the Pirates Of The Caribbean ride at Disneyland, would only cement him deeper into pop-culture endurance. The naysayers (amongst the horde included me) scoffed at a film based on a ride would even make a profit, but hindsight being what it is, I’d love to have a time machine right now and go back and buy Disney shares in 2003.

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March 31, 2015

Movie Review – My Little Eye

Filed under: Movie Review — Rodney Twelftree @ 12:01 am

My-Little-Eye-Review-Logo

- Summary -

Director :  Marc Evans
Year Of Release :   2002
Principal Cast :  Sean Cw Johnson, Kris Lemche, Stephen O’Reilly, Laura Regan, Jennifer Sky, Nick Mennell, Bradley Cooper.
Approx Running Time :   95 Minutes
Synopsis:  A group of strangers are locked inside an isolated house to be filmed, Big Brother style, for people watching on the Internet. However, as they are gradually killed off, the survivors must find a way to escape or communicate with the outside world, in order to live.
What we think :  Creepy, chilling little indie film delivers plenty of moments that make the hackles rise, and – although somewhat antiquated with its use of internet technology – make you reappraise installing that webcam. Featuring a before-he-was-famous role to Bradley Cooper, My Little Eye is effective for its budget and premise, and certainly ain’t a film you should watch with the lights out.


Turn off your computer.

Back at the turn of the millennium, before Facebook and Twitter and social media, and the utter explosion of the internet as we know it today, the Web was a mysterious thing filled with predators, evil and depravity. According to my grandmother. Nowadays, it’s still filled with plenty of that, but perhaps due to marginal desensitization on our part, we’ve pushed the acceptance of it into the background. My Little Eye has a premise entirely sold on the ability of people to watch things on the internet – a Big Brother styled element mixed with outright horror. A group of young hot people enter a house for six months, in order to win a million dollars, and filmed 24 hours a day across the web, only to find that as the finish line begins to approach, sinister events begin to take place. Strange parcels are delivered, instead of their usual food packages. They cannot find any mention of their “competition” anywhere online, except for a “deep web” site that gives rise to more sinister suspicions. Eventually, it becomes a race for survival, not just for money.

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March 30, 2015

Movie Review – Showgirls

Filed under: Movie Review,Raunchy Review — Rodney Twelftree @ 12:01 am

Showgirls-Review-Logo

- Summary -

Director :  Paul Verhoeven
Year Of Release :   1995
Principal Cast :  Elizabeth Berkley, Kyle MacLachlan, Gina Gershon, Glenn Plummer, Robert Davi, Gina Ravera, Alan Rachins, Lin Tucci, Greg Travis, Al Ruscio, Patrick Barstow, William Shockley, Michelle Johnston.
Approx Running Time :  131 Minutes
Synopsis:  A young wannabe singer goes to Vegas to become a showgirl.
What we think :  Some say it’s “so bad it’s good”, but I struggled to find that anywhere. Showgirls has oodles of problems, has virtually zero genuine charm, and makes a mockery of political correctness; if you’re into boobs, bums and bush, give this one a shot, otherwise you’re best avoiding it.

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Yeah, it’s as bad as they say.

Showgirls came out in 1995, back when I had just discovered a serious love of cinema. It’s a pity, then, that Showgirls isn’t great cinema. It truly isn’t – Showgirls is a terrible film, and yet since its release has gone on to become something of a cult hit, a minor classic of “so bad it’s good” trash that you watch knowing it’s bad, expecting worse, and getting so much less. It’s interesting to note the talent behind the screen on this film; Paul Verhoeven (together with screenwriter Joe Eszterhaus) had become a minor celebrity director in his own right following the success of 1992’s Basic Instinct, a film which wowed audiences with its audacious sexuality (conversely, it also caused plenty of controversy, heh heh). Verhoeven, a Dutch national who emigrated to Hollywood and directed such pulp fare as RoboCop and Total Recall, gave his films a salacious, soft-porn feel, as his European style clashed remarkably with Hollywood’s often restrained style. Not so much with his depictions of violence, rather with the tone of the sexual activity often portrayed in his films. To see a director of Verhoeven’s trashy, often misogynistic view of the world take up a film about strippers and Vegas showgirls, retrospectively you probably shoulda known what kind of film you were gonna get: Showgirls is exploitation of a kind not seen in Hollywood since the mid-80’s, when everything was boobs and bums.

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