Trailer Trash! – IT (Trailer 2)

A new trailer has bubbled up from down below for the upcoming remake of Stephen King’s IT. Creepy sewers and possible infection lie in wait, along with the world’s creepiest clown.

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Trailer Trash! – Wonder Woman (Trailer #4)

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Movie Review – Tabu: A Story of The South Seas (1931)

Director :   FW Murnau
Year Of Release :   1931
Principal Cast :  Matahi, Anne Chevalier, Bill Bambridge, Hitu.
Approx Running Time :   86 Minutes
Synopsis:  On the South Pacific island of Bora Bora, a young couple’s love is threatened when the tribal chief declares the girl a sacred virgin.

******

Although it might ostensibly be a fairly light, fluffy docufiction film, there’s a darkness to Tabu that resonates with director FW Murnau’s cinematic sensibilities. If you’ve seen Nosferatu, or even Sunrise, you can appreciate just how dark Murnau works with his subject matter, and while Tabu begins with a flourish of native Tahitian life (including a smattering of pre-code nudity, zoiks!) and a sense of euphoric freedom, things quickly turn bleak for the film’s primary subjects, lovers Matahi and Riri, as their love contravenes local law and custom. There’s a vague whiff of Romeo & Juliet about Tabu’s descent into tragedy, and although a noticeably weaker film from Murnau, there’s enough within the story to bring a sense of lament and melancholy to an age now far behind us.

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Movie Review – Patriots Day

Director :   Peter Berg
Year Of Release :   2016
Principal Cast :   Mark Wahlberg, John Goodman, JK Simmons, Vincent Curatola, Michelle Monaghan, Kevin Bacon, Alex Wolff, Themo Melikidze, Michael Beach, James Colby, Jimmy O Yang, Rachel Brosnahan, Christopher O’Shea, Melissa Benoist, Khandi Alexander, Jake Picking, David Ortiz.
Approx Running Time :   133 Minutes
Synopsis:  The story of the 2013 Boston Marathon bombing and the aftermath, which includes the city-wide manhunt to find the terrorists responsible.

*******

When he’s not making dopey alien invasion films, Peter Berg’s focus appears to be on real-world tragedy, particularly Lone Survivor (with Mark Wahlberg), Gulf Of Mexico disaster-flick Deepwater Horizon (again, with Mark Wahlberg), and here with one of America’s recent terrorist attacks, the 2013 Boston Marathon bombing – dear Lord, it’s America’s cinematic saviour, Mark Wahlberg. Patriots Day solemnifies the events of that awful day – a day we all watched play out in real time, followed by the city-wide manhunt for the perpetrators – and Berg’s direction wisely eschews overt chest-beating and maintains an air of truth and heart to the story, told through the eyes of Wahlberg’s BPD Sergeant Tommy Sanders. Compelling, heartbreaking, and honestly rather visceral, Patriots Day deserves more attention than it received with its lacklustre box-office.

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Movie Review – Resident Evil: The Final Chapter

Director :   Paul WS Anderson
Year Of Release :   2017
Principal Cast :  Milla Jovovich, Ali Larter, Shawn Roberts, Ruby Rose, Eoin Macken, William Levy, Iain Glen, Lee Joon-gi, Fraser James, Rola, Ever Gabo Anderson, Matthew Santoro.
Approx Running Time :   108 Minutes
Synopsis:  Alice returns to where the nightmare began: The Hive in Raccoon City, where the Umbrella Corporation is gathering its forces for a final strike against the only remaining survivors of the apocalypse.

*******

Stupefyingly awful, the gazillionth and final Resident Evil film desperately clings to its own past despite offering nothing close to resembling the original film’s tone and visceral horror thrills. Paul WS Anderson’s concluding chapter in his increasingly terrible franchise is numbing on multiple levels, from its incomprehensible plot, risible acting and brain-melting editing, to its utter inadequacy in forming a complete thought. Whereas the original Resident Evil was a taut, compact, hugely entertaining B-movie that delivered what it said on the box, The Final Chapter (indeed we can only hope it is) is sloppy, creatively vacuous and utterly irredeemable as a piece of cinema.

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Movie Review – Cavalcade (1933)

Director :  Frank Lloyd
Year Of Release :   1933
Principal Cast :  Diana Wynyard, Clive Brook, Una O’Connor, Herbert Mundin, Beryl Mercer, Irene Brown, Tempe Pigott, Merle Tottenham, Frank Lawton, Ursula Jeans, Margaret Lindsay, John Warburton.
Approx Running Time :   150 Minutes
Synopsis:  A cavalcade of English life from New Year’s Eve 1899 until 1933 seen through the eyes of well-to-do Londoners Jane and Robert Marryot. Amongst events touching their family are the Boer War, the death of Queen Victoria, the sinking of the Titanic and the Great War.

******

Lengthy, episodic melodrama plays like a grand epic but flounders due to a lack of focus: Cavalcade was the winner of Best Picture for 1933 up against the likes of 42nd Street, A Farewell To Arms and Little Women, all superior films I might add, and aside from its obvious fervent patriotism for the “good old days” of British imperialism, there’s little particularly special about the film’s overwrought dramatic mawkishness and overly simplified depiction of life during the early part of the 20th Century. Hugely successful in its day, it’s fair to say Cavalcade hasn’t aged well in terms of narrative, but remains an interesting watch thanks to director Frank Lloyd’s often jarring, solemnified mix of tragedy and pathos.

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Trailer Trash! – The Dark Tower

The film adaption of Stephen King’s The Dark Tower novels has finally given us a trailer! Starring Idris Elba and Matthew MacConaughey, The Dark Tower is high fantasy from the minds of one of the world’s preeminent horror writers. The official premise is as follows:

Jake Chambers (Tom Taylor) is a young 11-year-old adventure seeker who discovers clues about another dimension called Mid-World. Upon following the mystery, he is spirited away to Mid-World where he encounters a Gunslinger, Roland Deschain (Idris Elba), who is on a quest to reach the “Dark Tower” that resides in End-World and reach the nexus point between time and space that he hopes will save all existence from extinction. But with various monsters and a vicious sorcerer named Walter Padick (Matthew McConaughey) hot on their trail, the unlikely duo find that their quest may be difficult to complete.

Check out the trailer after the jump!

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Movie Review – Passengers

Director :  Morten Tyldum
Year Of Release :   2016
Principal Cast :  Chris Pratt, Jennifer Lawrence, Michael Sheen, Laurence Fishburne, Andy Garcia.
Approx Running Time :  117 Minutes
Synopsis: A spacecraft travelling to a distant colony planet and transporting thousands of people has a malfunction in its sleep chambers. As a result, two passengers are awakened 90 years early.

*******

For the purposes of reviewing Passengers accurately, this review will discuss specific spoilers. Plot points and the film’s key twist are revealed.

Passengers is an awfully creepy movie. It’s beautiful, sure, and watching two beautiful people like Chris Pratt and Jennifer Lawrence for two hours isn’t exactly a chore, but the altogether icky central premise (of which we’ll be discussing after the jump in considerable detail) makes one’s forehead crease in that way one does when one considers infanticide a viable option for population control. Passengers attempts to amplify deeper issues than it’s truly prepared to tackle – isolation, humanity, companionship, the solitude of interstellar travel – things Christopher Nolan briefly touched on in Interstellar, I might add, but it does so with the adequacy of mediocrity, never with acuity or a sense of the sublime.

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Movie Review – Miss Sloane

Director :   John Madden
Year Of Release :   2017
Principal Cast :  Jessica Chashtain, Mark Strong, Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Alison Pill, Michael Stuhlbarg, Jake Lacy, Sam Waterston, John Lithgow, Jack Murray, Grace Lynn Kung, Raol Bhaneja, Chuck Shamata, Douglas Smith, Meghann Fahey.
Approx Running Time :  132 Minutes
Synopsis:  In the high-stakes world of political power-brokers, Elizabeth Sloane is the most sought after and formidable lobbyist in D.C. But when taking on the most powerful opponent of her career, she finds winning may come at too high a price.

******

There’s perhaps no greater debate throughout the United States than that involving guns. The US Constitution’s infamous 2nd Amendment, allowing citizens the right to bear arms, has been a bone of social, ethical and moral conflict in policy decisions within the United States thanks to the influence of the powerful gun lobby (overseen by the NRA), a plot conceit central to Miss Sloane’s tense, engaging subtext in depicting US lobby groups and their sway over political legitimacy. Led by a rock-solid Jessica Chastain performance, anchored by a taut, labyrinthine plot by screenwriter Jonathan Perera, and driven by John Madden’s sparkling direction, Miss Sloane is far better than I gave it credit for (I’d never heard of it before it popped up on iTunes) and well worth your time to watch.

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Movie Review – Assignment, The (2017)

Director :   Walter Hill
Year Of Release :   2017
Principal Cast :  Michelle Rodriguez, Sigourney Weaver, Tony Shaloub, Anthony LaPaglia, Terry Chen, Paul McGillon, Caitlen Gerard, Zak Santiago.
Approx Running Time :   95 Minutes
Synopsis:   After waking up and discovering that he has undergone gender reassignment surgery, an assassin seeks to find the doctor responsible.

******

The Assignment is easily one of the greatest films ever made, or it is among the worst. Bizarre doesn’t even begin to cover this film’s raison d’etre, a weird gender reassignment plot twist that almost works in spite of lead actress Michelle Rodriguez’ fake penis and absent breasts (and chest hair) during an early nude sequence. The first of a few prolonged minutes the actress bares herself on screen, I might add. Ripe with utterly dreadful dialogue, fuelled with a grainy, grimy sense of urine-stained life beneath the real world, Walter Hill’s pulp-inspired tale of lurid sex changes and and an insane surgeon is immediately crass, lurid trash, and cult-classic-in-waiting brilliant. Part of me hated this film. The other part of me thought it was hilarious.

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