/Vale – Richard Dysart

Vale – Richard Dysart

Richard Dysart - 1929-2015
Richard Dysart – 1929-2015

American film and television actor Richard Dysart has passed away.

My first encounter with Mr Dysart on film came with his appearance in Clint Eastwood’s Pale Rider. Dysart played the conniving mining boss seeking to rid “his” town of Easwood’s iconic Preacher, and it was for this role I find the news of Mr Dysart’s passing one that stings. It was my first introduction to Eastwood, and consequently, the history I have with that film makes this news particularly saddening.

However, Mr Dysart wasn’t known only for Pale Rider, as he appeared in numerous films throughout his career. He appeared in The Last Days Of Patton (a television film made as a sequel to the feature film, Patton, also starring George C Scott in the title role), John Carpenter’s The Thing (alongside Kurt Russell, Wilford Brimley and Keith David), Hard Rain (with Morgan Freeman), Mask (with Cher), and in Back To The Future Part III, as the salesman trying to sell the newfangled “barbed wire” to Marty.

On television, Mr Dysart was most recognized in the series LA Law, for which he won an Emmy, as Leland McKenzie.

Richard Dysart passed away on April 5th, aged 86. Here’s knowing he’s up there with a good piece of hickory.

Pale-Rider-1985-Richard-Dysart-John-Russell-pic-9
Richard Dysart (L) as Coy LaHood in Clint Eastwood’s Pale Rider, with John Russell (R) as Marshall Stockburn.

© 2015, www.fernbyfilms.com. All rights reserved.

Normally detesting these kinds of bios, Rodney's keen love of film more often outclasses his ability to write convincingly about them. Never blessed with a body worthy of a porn star, nor being the heir to a wealthy industrialists fortune, nor suffering the tragedy of having his parents murdered outside a Gotham theater, Rodney is, contrary to popular opinion, neither Ron Jeremy, JD Rockefeller, or Batman. As a serious appreciator of film since 1996, Rodney's love affair with the medium has continued with his online blog, Fernby Films, a facility allowing him to communicate with fellow cineasts in their mutual love of all things movie.