Movie Review Star Trek 

Movie Review – Star Trek III: The Search For Spock

Climactic, adventurous entry into the Trek canon, sees Kirk dealing with his son, David, and the return of his best friend, Spock. Replete with the usual dry wit from the Enterprise crew, Star Trek III is a valiant effort to capitalise on the dramatic impetus attained with the preceding film. Unfortunately, some flat direction from Leonard Nimoy hamstrings this film’s momentum, and instead of being truly magnificent, remains merely average. Shatner is wonderful, however, and holds the film together even when he’s falling apart.

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Movie Review Star Trek 

Movie Review – Star Trek II: The Wrath Of Khan

After the balls-up that was the first theatrical journey for the crew, Gene Roddenberry was removed from production on the sequel, as it was deemed his fault the first film fared so dismally. Whether this is a correct assumption or not is perhaps not the point, but I think the result of that decision was a good one for the franchise, considering Wrath of Khan’s standing within the fan-bases’ loyalty. Wrath turned out to be a grand adventure and dramatic improvement for the series, much more convincing than it’s immediate predecessor, and reinvigorated the franchise overall. While the film cannot be said to have no faults, the end result is a sharp improvement.

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Movie Review Star Trek 

Movie Review – Star Trek: The Motion Picture (Directors Cut)

The main problem with Star Trek I is the lack of convincing dramatic tension on the part of the alien “villain”, although that nomenclature is actually inaccurate. V’ger is less a villain and more a misunderstood (and misunderstanding) newly formed life form, a concept overall that became a staple of the Star Trek serials that were made henceforth, including Next Generation, Deep Space Nine, and Voyager. And the lack of tension, disregarding that mounted by Kirk and Decker, is a major blow to a film filled with fine production values and wonderful themes. After all, with series creator Gene Roddenberry overseeing the whole thing, at least you know the shows themes of tolerance, understanding and exploration are intact. But it’s the lack of decent pacing, a languid development of the characters and the situation, that fatally hamstring the film. It moves at a snails pace (by comparison with later films) and by the end, you’re kinda glad it’s all over. Kirk, Spock, McCoy, Uhura, Bones, Chekov, Sulu, Scotty, and throw in Roddenberry’s wife Majel Barret as the Enterprise’s chief Doctor, as well as some of the best visual effects money could buy in 1979, and Star Trek is a fairly faithful cinematic rendition of what folks grew up with on the TV show.

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